Emerging Insulin Agents- Free Pharmacology Hours for Nurse Practitioners

insulinEmerging Insulin Agents and the Pivotal Role of Nurse Practitioners and Physician Assistants in Improving Diabetes Outcomes– In the US in 2012, 29.1 million people (9.1% of the population) had diabetes. Some projections estimate that diabetes will affect up to 50% of the US population by 2020, or as many as 1 in 3 Americans. Implementation of effective and aggressive evidence-based diabetes care can change this grim trajectory. Nurse practitioners (NPs) and physician assistants (PAs) play an increasingly pivotal role in managing diabetes patients and controlling morbidity and mortality. As frontline providers, NPs and PAs are in an ideal position to recognize and initiate corrective measures for inadequate treatments, help patients set and achieve therapeutic goals, and assess diabetes-related complications as they arise. NPs and PAs also play an active role in educating patients about their therapies, administrations, and dosages.
Apply knowledge of the phamacokinetic profiles of insulin formulations to develop an individualized insulin regimen from diagnosis to ongoing management, ensuring achievement of HbA1c goals and reducing the risk of complications.
Evaluate the place of new and emerging insulin formulations in the treatment armamentarium for diabetes.
Incorporate effective strategies for providing patient education and psychological support for patients with diabetes who are initiating or continuing insulin therapy.

1.0 Free Contact Hours for Nurse Practitioners which includes 0.25 Free Hours of Pharmacology

This course also offers Free CME for Physicians

Expires 11/25/17

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