Improving Immunization Rates in Private Practice- Free AMA CME

Building An Adult Immunization Practice: The Primary Care Physician’s Role in Disease Prevention– Vaccines have been highly effective in eliminating or significantly reducing the occurrence of many once-common diseases. However, barriers to immunization, particularly in older adults, have played a significant factor in the rising incidence of some vaccine-preventable diseases. Cost, reduced accessibility to vaccines, and complex or changing schedules for adult immunization have contributed to low immunization rates in at-risk adult populations. This can lead to significant clinical consequences and economic impacts due to vaccine-preventable diseases and related complications.
Primary care providers (PCPs) play an important role in administering recommended vaccines to their patients. However, PCPs must not only be knowledgeable about vaccines, they must incorporate systems in their offices to record, remind, and recall patients for vaccinations. They must also clearly communicate vaccine benefits and risks while understanding those factors that affect a patient’s acceptance and perception of vaccines.
To improve overall adult immunization rates, it is critical to expand PCP knowledge and competence regarding vaccine-preventable diseases and recommended vaccines. Building healthcare provider awareness of current immunization guidelines as well as the benefits of immunization is critical to improving vaccination rates. PCPs can lead the way in these efforts by educating their patients about vaccine-preventable diseases and taking proactive measures within their clinical practice to ensure patients are vaccinated when indicated.
Recognize the clinical consequences of vaccine-preventable diseases in adults.
Identify adult patients who will benefit from vaccination.
Educate patients about the benefits of vaccines.
Reduce and remove system- and patient-related barriers to vaccination.

2.0 Free AMA Pra CAT 1 CME for Physicians

Expires 6/15/13

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